Key Numbers for CPR

CPR Key Numbers
CPR Key Numbers

Our Key Numbers for CPR is a compilation of all of the important numbers we teach in our CPR courses. You can use this list as a study tool or as a quick reference guide.

Our Key Numbers Chart

Here are the latest Key Numbers for CPR. You can also download a printable copy by clicking the link below the chart. In includes the latest American Heart Association guidelines for the ratio of compressions to ventilations, depth of compressions, rate of compressions, rate of rescue breathing and more.

Compression / Ventilation Ratio (without advanced airway)
Adult
1 or 2 rescuers – 30:2
Child/Infant
1 rescuer – 30:2
2 or more rescuers – 15:2
Compression / Ventilation Ratio (with advanced airway)
Adult/Child/Infant
Continuous compressions at a rate of 100-120/min
Give 1 breath every 6 seconds (10 breaths/min)
Compression Rate
Adult/Child/Infant
100-120/minute
Compression Depth
Adult
At least 2 inches (5 cm)
Child
At least one-third of the diameter of the chest
About 2 inches (5 cm)
Infant
At least one-third of the diameter of the chest
About 1½ inches (4 cm)
Hand Placement
Adult
2 hands-on the lower half of the breastbone (sternum)
Child
2 hands or 1 hand (optional for a very small child) on the lower half of the breastbone (sternum)
Infant
1 rescuer
2 fingers in the center of the chest, just below the nipple line

 

 

2 or more rescuers
2 thumbs – encircling hands in the center of the chest just below the nipple

Rescue Breathing
Adult
1 Breath Every 6 Seconds (10 Breaths per minute)
Child/Infant
1 Breath every 3-5 Seconds (12-20 Breaths per minute)
Activation of EMS
Adult
If you are alone with no mobile phone, leave the victim to activate the emergency response system and get the AED before beginning CPR
Child/Infant
Witnessed collapse:
If you are alone with no mobile phone, leave the victim to activate the emergency response system and get the AED before beginning CPR

 

 

Unwitnessed collapse:
Give 2 minutes of CPR. Leave the victim to activate the emergency response system and get the AED Return to the child or infant and resume CPR, use the AED as soon as it is available.

Recognition of Cardiac Arrest
Adult/Child/Infant
Check for responsiveness – No breathing or only gasping (no normal breathing) No definite pulse felt within 10 seconds
Minimizing Interruptions
Adult/Child/Infant
Limit interruptions in chest compressions to less than 10 seconds
Compression / Ventilation Ratio
(without advanced airway)
Adult
1 or 2 rescuers – 30:2
Child/Infant
1 rescuer – 30:2
2 or more rescuers – 15:2
Compression / Ventilation Ratio (with advanced airway)
Adult/Child/Infant
Continuous compressions at a rate of 100-120/min
Give 1 breath every 6 seconds (10 breaths/min)
Compression Rate
Adult/Child/Infant
100-120/minute
Compression Depth
Adult
At least 2 inches (5 cm)
Child
At least one-third of the diameter of the chest
About 2 inches (5 cm)
Infant
At least one-third of the diameter of the chest
About 1½ inches (4 cm)
Hand Placement
Adult
2 hands-on the lower half of the breastbone (sternum)
Child
2 hands or 1 hand (optional for a very small child) on the lower half of the breastbone (sternum)
Infant
1 rescuer
2 fingers in the center of the chest, just below the nipple line

 

 

2 or more rescuers
2 thumbs – encircling hands in the center of the chest just below the nipple

Rescue Breathing
Adult
1 Breath Every 6 Seconds (10 Breaths per minute)
Child/Infant
1 Breath every 3-5 Seconds (12-20 Breaths per minute)
Activation of EMS
Adult
If you are alone with no mobile phone, leave the victim to activate the emergency response system and get the AED before beginning CPR
Child/Infant
Witnessed collapse:
If you are alone with no mobile phone, leave the victim to activate the emergency response system and get the AED before beginning CPR

 

 

Unwitnessed collapse:
Give 2 minutes of CPR. Leave the victim to activate the emergency response system and get the AED Return to the child or infant and resume CPR, use the AED as soon as it is available.

Recognition of Cardiac Arrest
Adult/Child/Infant
Check for responsiveness – No breathing or only gasping (no normal breathing) No definite pulse felt within 10 seconds
Minimizing Interruptions
Adult/Child/Infant
Limit interruptions in chest compressions to less than 10 seconds

 

 

DOWNLOAD CHART

 

 

American Heart Association Guidelines

The American Heart Association issues guidelines for Emergency Cardiovascular Care, also known as ECC. This chart includes the latest American Heart Association guidelines. All updates are included in all of our classes. Subscribe to our blog to receive all future American Heart Association updates to ECC guidelines. You can use our Key Numbers for CPR chart for any CPR class that follows American Heart Association guidelines.

Key Terms

Compression to Ventilation Ratio

The Compression to Ventilation Ratio is the number of chest compressions given followed by the numbers of ventilation breaths given while performing CPR. A compression to ventilation ratio of 30:2 means you should give 30 chest compressions followed by 2 ventilation breaths.

Rate of Compressions

This is the rate or speed of compressions per minute. A rate of 100/minute means the speed in which you are giving chest compressions would allow you to give 100 compressions in a minute if you did not need to stop to provide ventilations. The only time you would do chest compressions without stopping is if the victim were intubated. Typically, a single rescuer performing chest compressions at a rate of 100/minute will actually perform about 75 compressions due to the need to stop and give ventilations.

Depth of Compressions

This is simply how far down the victim’s chest is compressed with each chest compression.

Rescue Breathing

This is the number of ventilation breaths that are actually given each minute. This applies to victims who have a pulse but are not breathing.

Learn CPR and Save a Life Today

Our goal is to help save lives by teaching people life-saving CPR skills. If everyone learned how to perform CPR and use an AED, we could decrease the number of deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. You can learn CPR quickly and easily through one of our online classes. You can take the CPR class for free, there is no obligation.

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